ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Super cell thunderstorms hit North Dakota, northwest Minnesota on Monday night, Tuesday morning

Wind gusts peaked at 69 mph at 10:37 p.m., on Monday, five miles west-northwest of Grand Forks, according to the National Weather Service in Grand Forks. The weather service recorded wind gusts of about 50 at the Grand Forks office, said Carl Jones, weather service meteorologist in Grand Forks.

081121.n.gfh.Storm3.jpg
Sarah Larson, right, and her daughter, Ady, walk past a section of the roof of Weivoda Carpet Girl Inc. along Gateway Drive in Grand Forks Tuesday morning as crews work to clean up damage from the Monday, Aug. 9, 2021, storm. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

Supercell thunderstorms raced through eastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota Monday night and early Tuesday morning, dropping rain and hail and causing tree and structural damage.

The storm blew the roof off of Weivoda Carpet Girl Inc., at 5800 Gateway Drive in Grand Forks, and damaged a wall at Simonson Lumber at 3615 Gateway Drive. Branches and limbs also were torn off of trees across Grand Forks, including at Calvary Cemetery in Grand Forks.

Wind gusts peaked at 69 mph at 10:37 p.m. on Monday, five miles west-northwest of Grand Forks, according to the National Weather Service in Grand Forks. The weather service recorded wind gusts of about 50 mph at the Grand Forks office, said Carl Jones, weather service meteorologist in Grand Forks.

ADVERTISEMENT

091121.n.gfh.Storm1.jpg
An immature female Cooper's hawk perches on a downed boxelder tree in Calvary Cemetery in Grand Forks after Monday night's storm. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

Wind gusts of 69 mph were recorded two miles east of Logan Center, N.D., about 45 miles southwest of Grand Forks, Jones said. The weather service didn’t receive any damage reports from that area.

Trees were blown down near Binford, N.D., Jones said. Hail that was 1.75 inches in diameter or golf ball-sized also fell near Binford, the weather service said.

A funnel cloud eight miles northeast of Sharon, N.D., was spotted on radar at about 9:30 p.m. on Monday, but no damage has been reported, Jones said. A meteorologist planned to go to the site where radar indicated the funnel cloud, to see if there is evidence that it touched down anywhere.

After the storm passed through North Dakota, it moved into northwest Minnesota, where it damaged trees near Euclid, Minn., which is about 22 miles east of Grand Forks.

Super cell thunderstorms, like the ones that occurred on Monday night and early Tuesday morning, rapidly rotate, typically causing more damage than other thunderstorms, Jones said. The combination of humidity, instability in the atmosphere and an upper level cold front brewed up the storms, he said.

The storms also dropped varying rain across northeast northeast North Dakota and northwest Minnesota.

ADVERTISEMENT

“You got a pretty good drink if you were underneath these,” Jones said. Rain amounts of 3.5 inches fell in Langdon, N.D., and 2 inches was recorded in Thief River Falls in northwest Minnesota. Grand Forks received as much as 1.73 inches of rain, the weather service said.

The rain is too late to benefit small grains, but will help soybeans and corn, which still are filling pods and ears, said Bryan Hanson, Langdon Research Extension Center.

The Monday night rain in Langdon was more than it has received there in August, September and October 2020, combined, Hanson said.

“It’s always good to help bring up the stored soil moisture,” Hanson said. “At this point, producers are more worried about getting fall moisture so we don’t go into the spring dry, again.”

Temperatures in the 80s were in the forecast for Tuesday and Wednesday, then highs will be in the 70s on Thursday and Friday before turning warmer over the weekend. Temperatures from the mid- to upper 80s and 90s are forecast for Saturday through Monday, according to WDAY. There may be a chance of thunderstorms with the return of warmer temperatures.

081121.n.gfh.Storm4.jpg
A collapsed wall in the yard behind Simonson's Lumber on Gateway Drive is viewed early Tuesday after Monday night's storm. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

Related Topics: WEATHERGFH INSTAGRAM
Ann is a journalism veteran with nearly 40 years of reporting and editing experiences on a variety of topics including agriculture and business. Story ideas or questions can be sent to Ann by email at: abailey@agweek.com or phone at: 218-779-8093.
What To Read Next
Weather changing from one kind to another within a single day is what truly defines our climate.
In 1999, an earthquake of similar magnitude in Turkey resulted in 17,000 deaths.
Ice is slippery because the pressure of weight causes a thin layer of the ice to melt.
Every winter, that period of weather is impactful because it is around the limit of what our systems are designed to handle.