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Storms possibly on the way to Grand Forks region, and especially through Memorial Day

The chance for storms exists Saturday evening through Monday, possibly accompanied by isolated tornadoes and hail.

National Weather Service Memorial Day.JPG
A National Weather Service graphic shows the potential for thunderstorms on Monday, May 30. The notice was issued by the NWS on Saturday, May 28. Thunderstorms are possible in the Grand Forks region Saturday evening, Sunday and Monday, according to the NWS.
National Weather Service
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GRAND FORKS — Storms could be on tap for Memorial Day weekend, according to WDAY and the National Weather Service.

The chance for storms exists Saturday evening through Monday, possibly accompanied by isolated tornadoes and hail.

During a WDAY broadcast, meteorologist Robert Poynter said there is a chance of storms overnight Saturday and into Sunday, but "a more significant chance, though, of storms later Sunday night and into Monday morning."

The National Weather Service says the same. In a packet sent to the media Saturday morning, the weather service spelled it out in a series of bullet points, including:

  • The first round of storms could come Saturday night, "with the potential for isolated strong to severe thunderstorms along and south of Highway 200."
  • The second round is Sunday morning through the afternoon, with up to 70 mph gusts, isolated tornadoes and 1.5-inch hail possible.
  • The highest chance for severe weather is Monday, with scattered to numerous severe thunderstorms possible. The NWS said "hazards include wind gusts up to 70 mph, isolated tornadoes, hail up to 1.5 inches and localized flash flooding."

The National Weather Service also said localized heavy rainfall is possible Sunday from what could be multiple thunderstorms, with impacts that could include flooded roadways, road washouts and flooded basements.
On Monday, the worst of the weather could come in a corridor that starts at Grand Forks and Crookston and slants southeastward, through Fargo, Detroit Lakes and Fergus Falls, according to a National Weather Service graphic.

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Excessive rainfall is possible throughout eastern North Dakota and northwest Minnesota, according to the NWS.

Related Topics: WEATHERWDAY TV
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