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Snowy, frigid weather headed into Grand Forks region

“We have a very active weather pattern setting up,” WDAY meteorologist Lydia Blume said during the station’s Thursday morning broadcast. “It’s going to be a busy holiday weekend in the weather department.”

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Snowy, frigid weather is expected to move into the area, beginning Friday and lasting into next week, according to reports from WDAY and the National Weather Service.

“We have a very active weather pattern setting up,” WDAY meteorologist Lydia Blume said during the station’s Thursday morning broadcast. “It’s going to be a busy holiday weekend in the weather department.”

Blume said there are waves of energy moving through the region that will produce “a couple different rounds of precip. And after that moves out, the polar vortex moves in.”

The result, she said, will be “the coldest air of the season, right as we’re turning the calendar from 2021 to 2022.”

Temperatures in the Grand Forks region Friday are likely to see highs in the low 30s around noon, but falling into the teens later in the day. Friday night, temperatures likely will fall below zero, with gusty winds.

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On Saturday, Christmas Day, the National Weather Service is calling for a 30% chance of snow in the Grand Forks region, mainly after noon. Christmas night, there’s a 20% chance of snow, with lows dipping below zero. Winds throughout the day will be in the 10 mph range.

Sunday, there’s a 40% chance of snow, with temperatures in the teens and winds gusting to about 20 mph. Snow is likely to continue into Sunday night, the National Weather Service predicts, with a 70% chance of precipitation.

Next week, look for frigid temperatures, with a chance of snow on Monday and Tuesday, according to the NWS.

Related Topics: WEATHER
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