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Red Lake River at Crookston appears to peak below flood of record

In a Facebook post around 4:30 a.m., the National Weather Service in Grand Forks said the river was "peaking at around 27 feet and is NOT likely to rise much higher."

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National Weather Service graphic
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CROOKSTON, Minn. — It appears that the Red Lake River at Crookston, Minnesota has crested below 28 feet.

In a Facebook post around 4:30 a.m., the National Weather Service in Grand Forks said the river was "peaking at around 27 feet and is NOT likely to rise much higher."

A hydrograph of the river shows it cresting at about 27.07 feet and slowly beginning to fall. As of 6:45 a.m. it was at 26.96 feet.

The weather service had originally predicted the river would crest at around 29 feet and then later adjusted the crest to 28.5 feet. Both numbers were above Crookston's flood of record in 1997.

“The forecast is based on points upstream — flows coming in from smaller creeks and stuff like that into the Red Lake River, what’s going on up near Thief River Falls,” said Brad Hopkins, meteorologist at the Grand Forks office of the weather service. “What actually happened was there was a little bit less water than was anticipated. That and cooler temperatures helped a little bit.”

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River levels are expected to recede gradually in Crookston over the next few days.

“It’s like your bathtub draining — there’s only so much volume that can go through,” said Hopkins. “As the water hits that crest, the crest wave is moving to Fisher and Grand Forks, so as long as there’s no other water to go in farther upstream, it should continue to drop down.”

On Sunday, Gov. Tim Walz activated the Minnesota National Guard to Crookston to help with sandbagging efforts in the city.

This is a developing story. Check back later for more.

Related Topics: FLOODING
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