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John Wheeler: Television storm interruptions can be annoying

We are being repetitive for a reason.

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FARGO โ€” When severe thunderstorms are passing through the region, television stations are required by the Federal Communications Commission to relay visual and audible warnings to share this pertinent information. This is the law. Contemporary methods include scrolling text with a warning tone or, for more critical situations, we break into the programming with a live report. Either way, people at home watching their shows get annoyed, mostly when they are not in the path of the storm.

These program interruptions are quite repetitive and will last longer than might seem necessary to someone not in the path of the storms. However, we are repetitive for a reason. Many people are not watching this particular program for entertainment, but turn to their favorite meteorologists when a storm is approaching their home. In fact, our viewer ratings spike during storm coverage. So please be understanding and patient. We are just doing our jobs.

John Wheeler is Chief Meteorologist for WDAY, a position he has had since May of 1985. Wheeler grew up in the South, in Louisiana and Alabama, and cites his family's move to the Midwest as important to developing his fascination with weather and climate. Wheeler lived in Wisconsin and Iowa as a teenager. He attended Iowa State University and achieved a B.S. degree in Meteorology in 1984. Wheeler worked about a year at WOI-TV in central Iowa before moving to Fargo and WDAY..
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