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VETERANS

Eighty years ago this month, the first of 6,000 soldiers came to the Twin Cities during World War II to be trained at a covert military intelligence language school. Most were Nisei, born in the United States to Japanese immigrant parents. They would later be shipped to the Pacific theater to intercept radio signal communications, translate captured battle plans, interrogate prisoners of war, and even crawl toward enemy lines to spy on Japanese commanders.
A mortar attack on May 1, 2010, killed Eric Finniginam at a forward operating base in Kunar province. He was 26.
Vets are encouraged to apply for the all-expenses-paid trip to visit war memorials and other historic landmarks in the nation's capital.
A local veterans group is worried about its ability to buy land for their planned gathering center.

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Progress is being made as the group hopes to buy land and self-finance a gathering building and parking lot project.
Individuals who have stories or photos of veterans or memorials to share can do so with the company.
Remains of U.S. service members who died in a Tokyo military prison fire in 1945 are undergoing DNA analysis at a laboratory in Hawaii.
"The Cass County Commission should quickly get on board to approve this vital project," writes InForum columnist Jim Shaw. "It’s a no-brainer."
Patrick Jary’s TikTok account, @patriotickenny, has 1.8 million followers.
Minnesota 96-year-old Arnold "Buck" J. Zahratka told reporters that he was amazed by the commendation and reflected on his service in the U.S. Army during the pivotal battle.

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The legislation, named the "Burial Equity for Guards and Reserves Act," allows members of the National Guard and reserve to be eligible for burial in state veterans cemeteries without the cemetery losing funds from the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Families of veterans who died in a Tokyo military prison fire in 1945, including a North Dakotan, are hopeful their loved ones' remains can finally be brought home.
“While we’ve seen homelessness increase in other populations particularly with families with children, on any given night we now have 20 to 30 veterans who are homeless,” a VA official told The Forum.

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