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RESTAURANTS AND BARS

The business announced the closure on Facebook.
Management made the announcement on Dec. 30, according to the restaurant’s social media page. No reason was given for the closure, and management declined to respond to a request for comment.
Area chefs sharpen their knives against haters of the bird and say they "can't imagine doing Thanksgiving without a turkey."
Full-service restaurants — those with wait-staff and sit-down service — saw jobs decline by 16%. Limited-service restaurants, such as fast-food eateries, saw a 27% decline. But some St. Paul retailers and food service employers actually raised wages in 2018 and 2019, apparently in anticipation of the mandate, or in competition for workers with higher-paying jobs across the river.

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Latest Headlines
Hal Gershman's dream of launching a classic American steakhouse, in the location of his father's first business in downtown Grand Forks, comes true.
When the Crookston, Minnesota, Mexican and Salvadorian restaurant closed, its only employee was owner Julia Mejia.
Thanks to COVID — the "gift" that keeps on giving — you may have to brave your Great Aunt Violet's hideous holiday gifts this year with nogless eggs and "nulled" cider. Then again, maybe not. Some local retailers say all consumers need is a little patience.
In place of tipping, many restaurants have introduced a service charge model. But what exactly does the service charge do, and is this what the future of the local restaurant industry looks like?
While the rest of the world may operate according to the Scoville scale to measure the pungency of chili peppers, many of us North Dakotans (this writer included) operate according to a whole new scale that I like the call the "Tollefsrud unit." This ranges from a mild “uffda” for when Ole Tollefsrud gets heartburn after wife Phyllis slips a bell pepper into her sloppy Joe mix to a passionate "Fyda!" when she tries to spice up things with a teaspoon of Sriracha in the hotdish.
The company says franchise shops are planned for Fargo, Grand Forks, Bismarck and Minot.

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While it seems restaurants selling Mexican food have been in Grand Forks forever, the first Mexican restaurant began downtown in the 1960s.
Couple launches Baptism River Barbecue Co. with a flair for working together, and sourcing local flavors and ingredients.
Contributor W. Scott Olsen says the food makes it worth the drive to Euclid's One N Only.

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