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INDIGENOUS

In all, the federal infrastructure law will mean $13 billion for a range of upgrades on tribal lands nationwide. That’s everything from better sewers, repaired dams, buried cable to bring faster internet and improvements meant to foster cleaner water and energy.
The speculation began last month, after a leaked draft of a U.S. Supreme Court opinion suggested the court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that guaranteed the right to an abortion nationwide. Indigenous abortion rights advocates say the questions have mostly come from non-Native people: “All of a sudden, this issue that’s going to impact white women too — or impact white women more broadly — now we’re being seen as the potential savior."
This month, the Lower Phalen Creek Project will begin construction on a 9,000 square foot interpretive center near the entrance of the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary to welcome people back to Wakan Tipi and educate the public.
The Bois Forte Band of Chippewa celebrated the return of thousands of acres of forest lands — set in motion thanks to land conservation efforts.

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At its opening in 1975, the Minneapolis American Indian Center was among the first urban American Indian community centers in the nation.
Twin Cities Native Lacrosse has brought people together to participate in the Indigenous tradition of lacrosse
The documentary "Bring Her Home" helps bring awareness to the epidemic of Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women. Leya Hale hosted a screening of her documentary at Pioneer Public TV in Granite Falls in early May.
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Buckanaga Social Club is hosting a fashion show at Duluth Coffee Co.'s Roastery on July 21, and was accepted for their second showing at Rise New York Fashion Week in September.
In a statement, Minnesota Indian Affairs Council Cultural Resources Specialist Dylan Goetsch said neither the council nor the state archaeologist were made aware of the discovery as required by state law.
The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation voted in 2013 to allow alcohol, but reports in 2017 say authorities never enacted the vote, leaving it the last dry reservation in South Dakota.

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Religious leaders in the Fargo-Moorhead area and across the country face hard questions about how denominations, including Catholic, Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian, Quaker and Unitarian, worked with federal officials to strip Native American children of their cultural traditions at boarding schools.
Teresa Peterson and Walter "Super" LaBatte of the Upper Sioux Community offer a treasure of Dakota stories passed down from the generations, as well as their own, in their book, "Voices From Pejuhutazizi: Dakota Stories and Storytellers."
Annual event resumes after pandemic forced cancellation in the past two years

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