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HEALTH

"Minding Our Elders" columnist Carol Bradley Bursack
North Dakota executive and legislative leaders remain clueless in leading our state out from the abyss of unnecessary hospitalizations and deaths, terrified of right-wing, anti-science extremists. Misinformation should be condemned and counteracted and not ignored.
The new spaces at Essentia Health in Fargo focus on comfort and needs of moms and babies.
About 170 people participated in the event to support those living with Alzheimer's and their caregivers

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500 million free at-home rapid tests will be available to Americans starting in January.
In today's "Minding Our Elders" column, Carol Bradley Bursack offers advice to a reader who wants to provide accurate information to the doctor without upsetting their mother.
Although fatality reports can lag up to 14 days from the date of death due to reporting allowances, it's clear the COVID-19 death rate in South Dakota is on the rise. There were 114 deaths reported in November, more than in any month since January, when 290 deaths were reported. But with two weeks left in the month, December is on pace to be a deadlier month. This week alone, 35 fatalities were reported by state health officials.
An individual in their 60s in Todd County has died from influenza, the South Dakota Department of Health reported Thursday, Dec. 16. 
The 11 newly reported COVID-19 fatalities means South Dakota health officials have reported 96 deaths thus far in December, and 32 this week alone.
While Sanford Health continues to treat non-COVID-19 patients with non-urgent conditions at its Sioux Falls hospital, Avera Health is pushing any non-urgent procedures, especially those requiring an overnight stay, to the spring to make room for the surge in COVID-19 patients.

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Caffeine’s chemical properties actually help a person feel like they have more energy by working to increase blood flow throughout the body
Mike and Laura Bidne welcomed twins Julia and Thomas 13 weeks early back in the summer of 2008.
An overview of seasonal affective disorder, also commonly known as the "winter blues," from a report from the U.S. National Library of Medicine National Institute of Health and input from Dr. Andrew McLean, who is the Psychiatry and Behavioral Science Department chair at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

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