ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FARGO-MOORHEAD DIVERSION

Latest Headlines
St. Benedict, which has been at its rural Horace site since 1882, finds its growth potential limited by the path of the diversion channel, which the parish decided makes the location unviable over the long term.
Metro flood project now has acquired land for all of diversion channel, 82.5% of construction footprint, with 12 cases still in negotiations.
Members Only
Ryan Richard built a new farmstead when the original plan for the Fargo-Moorhead Flood Diversion threatened his original farmstead. But the route of the revised diversion project now runs through his new farmstead, a setback he said will cost him millions of dollars.
The funding commitment completes the federal government's $750 million share of the $3.2 billion flood-control project to protect the Fargo-Moorhead metro area.
Construction of the Fargo-Moorhead flood diversion could bring up to 7,000 jobs over six years.
Richland and Wilkin counties have identified housing as the key priority for spending the settlement in their dispute with the Metro Flood Diversion Authority. Lawyers for the diversion estimated 'conservatively' that litigation delays were costing the project $70 million per year from inflation.

ADVERTISEMENT

Inflation resulting from delays caused by legal challenges have increased the project's cost from $2.75 billion to $3.2 billion, but officials say approximately $830 million in savings will come from low-cost financing and efficiencies through a novel private-public partnership
The Clemenson-Smith 1 1/2 miles from Horace, N.D., was the first in the area to be homesteaded in 1871. Now, 150 years later, the family faces a future with half of the farm sold to make way for the diversion channel that is part of a $2.75-billion flood-control project to protect the Fargo-Moorhead metro area.
The 4-mile project is expected to take three years in the area of Oxbow, Hickson and the Wild Rice River.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT