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Worth a Look: Bald eagle webcam back online

The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources' bald eagle webcam is back online, and the star of the show laid her first egg of the season sometime Tuesday and had two eggs as of Friday. The camera and associated technology are paid for and maint...

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The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources’ bald eagle webcam is back online, and the star of the show laid her first egg of the season sometime Tuesday and had two eggs as of Friday. The camera and associated technology are paid for and maintained by the DNR’s Nongame Wildlife Program, largely supported by voluntary contributions people make at tax time.

According to the DNR, this is the third year the same pair of bald eagles has been brought into thousands of homes and classrooms around the world by a small weatherproof camera mounted above their nest at an undisclosed location in the metro region.

Bald eagles typically lay one to three eggs, which incubate for about 35 days before hatching. Both male and female eagles, which mate for life, take turns sitting on the eggs to keep them warm. Last year, three eggs hatched after being laid in mid-February, but only two eaglets fledged, or grew up to fly off. The year before that, the pair laid three eggs around Jan. 1, and all of them froze. The female eagle has been identified by a leg band as having been rehabilitated at the University of Minnesota Raptor Center, then released back into the wild in 2010.

“We’re lucky to live in a place that has such awesome natural features and outdoor recreational opportunities,” Erica Hoaglund, DNR nongame wildlife specialist, said. “We’re hoping people will get sufficiently excited watching these eagles to get out to a park and experience nature firsthand.”

In 2014, nearly half a million people from all 50 states and 155 countries tuned in to the DNR’s eaglecam to watch the family saga of America’s iconic raptor unfold in real time. In addition to live video on the DNR’s website, information on the eagles’ activities will be regularly posted on the Nongame Wildlife Program’s Facebook page, and people can sign up for email or Twitter updates. Follow the action at www.webcams.dnr.state.mn.us/eagle .

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Related Topics: BIRDSTECHNOLOGYWILDLIFE
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