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Explaining what happens at North Dakota Game and Fish check points

In this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors, Mike Anderson takes us to southeastern North Dakota where game wardens are conducting a check station for hunters and anglers.

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North Dakota Game and Fish officials perform a check point stop.
Contributed / North Dakota Game and Fish Department
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BISMARCK -- A few times a year North Dakota Game and Fish Department game wardens conduct check stations at various locations statewide.

In this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors, Mike Anderson takes us to southeastern North Dakota where game wardens are conducting a check station for hunters and anglers.

Mark Pollert, North Dakota Game and Fish game warden supervisor, says most hunters and anglers are through the check station in about five minutes.

“We talk to the hunters and fishermen that are traveling down the roadway, and we kind of monitor their activities and see how they’ve done,” Pollert says.

These check points provide valuable information to game wardens.

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Game wardens will stop most vehicles on the roadway to see if they’ve been hunting or fishing.

Most hunters and anglers are following the letter of the law and are cooperative and appreciative that game wardens are out doing their job to protect the wildlife and fisheries resources.

MORE NEWS RELATING TO ND GAME & FISH:
In this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors, Mike Anderson tells us about the Take Someone New Ice Fishing Challenge, and how you could possibly win a fish house.

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