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Explaining North Dakota's PLOTS program for hunters

The program involves about 800,000 acres across the state -- about the same as last year -- although Kading says the western part of the state had a slight decrease in acreage

Plots.jpg
Land enrolled in the North Dakota Game and Fish Department's Private Land Open To Sportsmen program is clearly marked with triangular yellow signs. Nonresidents can't hunt PLOTS acreage or wildlife management area lands from Oct. 8 through Oct. 14, 2022, the first seven days of North Dakota's pheasant season.
Contributed/North Dakota Game and Fish Department
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BISMARCK — In this episode of North Dakota Outdoors, host Mike Anderson talks with Kevin Kading of the North Dakota Game and Fish Department on the state’s PLOTS program, private land open to sportsmen.

The program involves about 800,000 acres across the state -- about the same as last year -- although Kading says the western part of the state had a slight decrease in acreage countering an increase on the eastern side. Those changes are beneficial as new lands could provide new experiences for hunters.

“That's part of the nature of private lands programs,” Kading said. “These are just private lands that are enrolled in an agreement with Game and Fish and so some of these are the shortest two years and some of them are longer than that. Maybe up to 20 years.”

After last year’s drought conditions, Kading says conditions have greatly improved.

“It's just been unbelievable, really,” he said. “You know, the rebound and the recovery of the grasslands across the state. From the wildlife standpoint, it's going to help a lot and from hunting cover -- habitat wise -- the plots tracks are going to look a lot better this year.”

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Kading and Anderson talk about haying, plot agreements, electronics, rules and ethics and more.

MORE NEWS RELATING TO ND GAME & FISH:
While outdoors enjoying winter activities it’s important to keep your distance from wintering wildlife. Mike Anderson explains in this week’s segment of North Dakota Outdoors.

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