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Craig Engwall leaves Minnesota Deer Hunters Association

The former DNR official will go to the Minnesota Board of Soil and Water Resources.

Craig Engwall
Craig Engwall has resigned as executive director of the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association.
Contributed / Craig Engwall
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GRAND RAPIDS — Craig Engwall has resigned as executive director of the Minnesota Deer Hunters Association, the state’s largest advocacy group for deer hunters.

The move was announced Wednesday by Denis Quarberg, president of the group. Engwall had headed the association for the past 7 1/2 years. Before that Engwall served in various positions with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Officials at the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources announced Thursday that Engwall will be joining the agency as its senior legal
and program advisor.

Engwall “helped the organization navigate its way through the pandemic and our membership is now higher than it was at the beginning of the pandemic. We wish Craig nothing but the best in his new opportunity,’’ Quarberg said in a statement Wednesday.

The association will be accepting applications from potential executive director candidates through Aug. 26. For more information go to mndeerhunters.com .

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READ MORE IN NORTHLAND OUTDOORS
Richard “Skittles” Larson reached the buoy monument at Young’s Bay on Minnesota’s Northwest Angle about 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2, ending a hiking trip that began in the wee hours of Tuesday, Nov. 23, 2021.

This story was updated at 9:08 a.m. Aug. 4 with information from the Minnesota Board of Soil and Water Resources. It was originally published at 1:17 p.m. Aug. 3.

John Myers reports on the outdoors, natural resources and the environment for the Duluth News Tribune. You can reach him at jmyers@duluthnews.com.
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