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Bring a kid, fish for free in Minnesota this weekend

Adults don't need a license June 10-12 if they fish with children age 15 and under.

kid fishing with adult
Adults can fish for free, without a license, in Minnesota from Friday through Sunday if they bring one or more children fishing with them.
Contributed / Michigan United Conservation Clubs
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Minnesota is hosting its annual Take a Kid Fishing weekend Friday through Sunday, when any adult can fish without a license if they take children age 15 or younger along.

Youth age 15 and younger do not require fishing licenses at any time of the year, though they must observe all fishing seasons and other regulations. Take a Kid Fishing weekend allows adults to fish without a license if they have one or more children fishing with them.

“Fishing together with kids is a fun way to spend time in the outdoors,” said Benji Kohn, volunteer mentor program coordinator with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. “Making great memories can be as easy as finding some rods and reels, finding or buying worms for bait, and heading to a nearby lake to give fishing a try.”

The DNR’s "Learn to Fish" website, mndnr.gov/GoFishing , covers fishing basics; where to fish; how to catch different types of fish; and the importance of fishing ethics and being stewards of Minnesota’s natural resources.

For anglers across Minnesota, the DNR has an online map of piers and shorefishing sites at mndnr.gov/FishingPiers . Parking at these locations is generally located within 300 feet of the pier or shore fishing site, with a hard surface path from the parking area. Most are designed to meet the needs of people with disabilities.

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Share your outdoor stories by uploading Minnesota fishing photos using the DNR photo uploader at mndnr.gov/Fishing/Photos.html .

John Myers reports on the outdoors, natural resources and the environment for the Duluth News Tribune. You can reach him at jmyers@duluthnews.com.
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