MINNEAPOLIS -- Trevor May didn’t dare look at his mentions. He knew better.

Still, after chatting with reporters in the Twins’ clubhouse following Wednesday’s brutal 14-4 loss, May knew he wanted no part of Twitter. Not after surrendering a go-ahead homer to New York Mets pinch hitter Dominic Smith about an hour earlier.

Well aware that his mentions would be a cesspool for hate, the 29-year-old reliever sat at his locker after the game and fired off a brief tweet, letting everyone know he’d be taking a hiatus from the social media platform.

“It wasn’t like I was scrolling Twitter and decided I was going to take a break,” May said. “I was already cognizant of what was going to be said because of what I’ve been seeing for weeks with people being like, ‘You guys better not blow it.’ I really wanted to win that game and I was about as angry with the result as I’ve been in my career. I was just like, ‘I don’t want to deal with this right now.'”

His time away lasted exactly 70 minutes before he sent another tweet, changing his tune, and imploring people to take all the pot shots they wanted.

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“I’m committed to being really accessible, so running away wasn’t really an option,” May said. “I realized that not dealing with it made it worse. I’m the kind of guy that needs to have something actionable after something goes wrong. Finally, I was like, ‘If I need to be the punching bag, I can handle it.’ I take pride in my ability to handle tough situations on the mound and off the mound.”

There was a time not too long ago that May would have stayed away for much longer. He used to live in his mentions, particularly when he was younger, taking way too much consideration into what people were saying about him.

“It used to bother me a lot,” May said. “It’s been something my whole life that I’ve been trying to work on. Just reducing the amount of validation I need from other people. It’s tough because that’s human nature. I’ve gained a lot of confidence in myself over the years, and that has really helped.”

It also helps that May was actually showered with support almost immediately after returning to Twitter

“I got way more positive feedback than negative feedback,” May said. “I remember I kept thinking, ‘Maybe I should just steer into the skid and kill them with kindness if I need to.’ That usually solves the problem. It was something that I was able to meet head on and it ended up being a silver lining of the situation. I’m not going to be afraid to go on Twitter after a bad outing. Plus, at the end of the day, more hate just means more people are watching. That’s going to be good for us in the long run.”

Buxton getting closer

Byron Buxton (concussion-like symptoms) appears to be nearing a return to the lineup, though manager Rocco Baldelli wouldn’t speculate exactly when that would be.

“He has to pass the concussion protocol testing before he can go out there and play,” Baldelli said. “We will focus our energy on that (on Sunday) and see how he’s doing. The doctors run the show here as far as situations like this when someone is dealing with concussion related symptoms. They are going to be the ones to decide when he’s going to do everything and how it goes.”

Arraez in the outfield

Luis Arraez is clearly willing to do whatever it takes to get on the field.

While he’s an infielder by trade, Arraez has started to prove himself as an outfielder, most recently filling in for Eddie Rosario in left field.

“You see a guy who’s able to make adjustments and learn on the go and do different things,” Baldelli said. “Not every guy has the ability to do that. He’s a guy who just grabbed an outfielder’s glove and went out there. Truthfully, I’m not sure he has played much outfield before this. He’s an infielder who we’re asking to do something that he’s not overly familiar with, and he’s done a great job out there.”