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Scotty's Deli in Grand Forks closes

The business announced the closure on Facebook.

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In this Herald file photo, owners Christy, left, and Scott Doyea talk at Scotty's Deli & Catering in Grand Forks shortly after its opening in 2015. Photo by Tim Albrecht/Grand Forks Herald
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GRAND FORKS — A popular Grand Forks lunch spot has announced it is closing permanently.

Scotty's Deli, located at 1113 S. Washington St., announced on social media on Friday morning, Jan. 7, that it would be closing its doors.

"We’ve been struggling with writing this all morning," the post read. "Due to several unforeseen circumstances Scotty’s will not be opening again. We would like to thank all of our great customers and our amazing staff for the last 6 years. We will miss all of you."

The post did not reveal any other information about the closure.

The small, family-owned and operated restaurant served various comfort foods, including sandwiches, wraps, lavosh and more.

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Scott and Christy Doyea opened the Grand Forks restaurant in 2015.

This marks the second restaurant closure in Grand Forks. HuHot Mongolian Grill in Grand Forks closed at the end of 2021 .

Management made the announcement on Dec. 30, according to the restaurant's social media page. No reason was given for the closure, and management declined to respond to a request for comment.

Related Topics: RESTAURANTS AND BARS
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