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EAST GRAND FORKS SCHOOL BOARD

Co-owner of a local business is a mother of four.
A school board decision means school is scheduled for June 2
Committee's recommendation is set to head to a meeting of the School Board on Monday.
U.S. Supreme Court justices voted 6-3 to place a stay on a federal rule that would have required many employers to require their employees to either get vaccinated or regularly tested for COVID-19

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Wednesday’s meeting was hosted at City Hall by the Local Government Advisory Committee, which includes select members from all four of Grand Forks’ property-taxing groups.
Since Jennifer Modeen was hired in August, the district has taken several steps to address student mental health, including forming a mental health team across all schools and establishing adult social-emotional learning training for every building in the district.
As COVID-19 cases in the district and community continue to fall, the East Grand Forks School Board voted unanimously to relax some COVID mitigation measures, including the controversial mask requirement for grades K through 6.
The board discussed possibly rolling back COVID-19 safety strategies in light of low case numbers in the district at a working meeting Wednesday morning, Oct. 20.
COVID-19 numbers in the district have fallen since the board last month voted to require masks for students in sixth grade and younger. The board will meet early next week on a to-be-determined date to go over updated COVID-19 numbers and discuss future mitigation strategies.
The dissent comes two weeks after the last School Board meeting, at which board members decide to require masks for K-6 students.

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The board voted unanimously to move from COVID mitigation strategy level two to level three under the Safe Return to In-Person Learning Plan Monday night, Sept. 13.
On the first day of school in the East Grand Forks School District on Tuesday, Sept. 7, some students were wearing masks and some weren't. Other than that, the year's first drop-off seemed to proceed as normal.
Meanwhile, away from meetings, board members are being threatened.

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