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CONCORDIA COLLEGE

Williston, N.D., native and Concordia College graduate Alex Ritter's videos and glass sculptures of real-life T-cells killing cancer cells give hope in the fight.
“It’s a little piece of heaven on earth. It truly is a special occasion,” says artistic director Michael Culloton.
There is a lot of hope, joy and excitement knowing the end of the pandemic is near and that more students can return to campus, one leader said.
"'There are stories and scenes from my real life but fictionalized to make it more interesting," author Stacey Potter says about "The Project."

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What would you want people to say at your funeral?
The annual concert was turned around this year for a virtual performance that will be available to watch beginning Friday, Dec. 18.
MOORHEAD, Minn. — Concordia College announced Thursday, Sept. 24, that starting in the fall of 2021 it is dropping its annual tuition price tag from $42,750 to $27,500, a $15,250 reduction.
FARGO — Video released Monday night, Aug. 17, shows the full interaction between a Black Lives Matter organizer and Moorhead police officers during a traffic stop this weekend near Concordia College.
MOORHEAD, Minn. — A Black Lives Matter leader from Fargo is calling for an investigation into a Moorhead police officer who she claims tried to force his way into her vehicle during a traffic stop this weekend.
Distance learning has been particularly challenging for instructors and their students who play pianos or other large instruments

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The Concordia Orchestra from Concordia College in Moorhead will perform a joint concert with the Red River High School Concert Orchestra at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 28 at the high school’s Performance Hall.
MOORHEAD, Minn. — Stephen Letnes won’t know if he is taking home an Emmy until Tuesday, Sept. 24, but he knows he’s already a winner.
The future of work is changing in North Dakota and elsewhere, and liberal arts programs have been targeted for cuts nationwide. Yet leaders in and around North Dakota say liberal arts will remain important, even as technology takes over the job market.

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