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OUTDOORS ISSUES

People wanted the ice road, and it’s definitely needed, Brett Alsleben of Points North Services on the Northwest Angle mainland said.
The bipartisan legislation would invest nearly $1.4 billion annually in proactive efforts to help wildlife at risk.
Cougar sightings have become more common in Minnesota than they were 20 years ago, but the Department of Natural Resources maintains the state does not have a breeding population of the big cats.
Supplemental feeding of deer, even in northern states like Minnesota, is almost never necessary and often does more harm than good, DNR big game program leader Barb Keller said. Whitetails, one of the most adaptable wildlife species in the country, survive harsh winter conditions by slowing their metabolism, foraging on natural browse and leaning on the fat reserves they stored up through the fall.

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Latest Headlines
Study on the Grand Portage Reservation sheds light on complex wildlife relationships.
Polling group Data for Progress surveyed more than 1,100 likely voters in the Dec. 3-6 poll, and 91% of respondents said it was important to save at-risk wildlife, fish and plants for future generations.
Polling group Data for Progress surveyed more than 1,100 likely voters in the Dec. 3-6 poll, and 91% of respondents said it was important to save at-risk wildlife, fish and plants for future generations.
The North Dakota Game and Fish Department and North Dakota Department of Agriculture are again opening the Coyote Catalog, a statewide effort designed to connect committed hunters and trappers with landowners who are dealing with coyotes in their areas.
The initiative is designed to provide biodiversity and prosperity for wildlife, pollinators, ranching operations and communities.
Wentz WPA still has plenty of walleyes for ice anglers to target this winter.

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Lawndale Creek restoration project helps clean water in Buffalo River while providing trout habitat in unlikely place
Invading parasite decimated fish populations until a chemical poison was developed to kill their larvae.
A native of the Turtle Lake-Mercer, North Dakota, area in McLean County, Casey Anderson is a 20-year Game and Fish Department veteran. He previously was assistant wildlife chief before being appointed to his new position in September.

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