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STEVE GANDER

The bridge would connect Grand Forks and East Grand Forks at the end of 32nd Avenue South.
The lights on Sorlie Bridge will remain blue and yellow for at least a week.
On Tuesday, East Grand Forks City Council members voted 5-2 to forward a 30-year, 1.25% sales tax to the Minnesota Legislature for further approval. Mayor Steve Gander, though, said on Wednesday that he might veto their decision.
Organizers are putting the finishing touches on a celebration of Grand Forks' third Indigenous Peoples Day. Across the river last month, East Grand Forks leaders heard a pitch to adopt the holiday themselves, but a few wondered how it would work with Columbus Day.

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During a speech in April, Mayor Gander announced his list of community priorities.
Until leaders in Grand Forks and East Grand Forks can agree on a location for a new southside bridge across the Red River, they’ll remain a bit like the geography itself – close, but not yet together.
During Mayor Steve Gander’s annual State of the City event last week, the mayor turned over the mic to city Parks and Recreation Director Reid Huttunen, who spoke about the need to improve the community’s ice arenas and Stauss Park, its main baseball complex.
I challenge the City Council members who do not see the value of this position to attend a meeting of either the Library Board and/or the Board of the Friends of the Library to gather their input before making a final decision.
Minnesota businesses along the border are especially being victimized, since potential customers can simply cross into North Dakota and visit one of the city’s many open bars and restaurants.
Nearly a dozen people gathered to sit at tables outside, and they started off with a round of hard coffee drinks. Mimosas followed, which quickly began to freeze as the temperature Saturday morning barely cracked zero degrees. The attendees discussed a possible protest and a a proposed aid package for local businesses. Talk turned to closing a downtown street for outdoor dining, drinks in tents, fish houses.

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Under financial pressure reportedly brought on by a gubernatorial order, an East Grand Forks bar and grill opened for the fourth night in a row on Saturday, despite a statewide restriction. It's facing a lawsuit from Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison and a restraining order from a Polk County judge, and penalties could quickly pile up from there. Ellison told the Herald that the figurative ball is in the restaurant's court.
There have been talks there of a mass reopening after one restaurant defied Governor Walz's shutdown order.
After residents and the Herald asked why they didn't, East Grand Forks City Council members began wearing COVID-19 face coverings at their weekly meetings. The city's attorney and a lawyer at the League of Minnesota Cities, which aids local governments across the state, both told city officials that Gov. Tim Walz's mask mandate does not allow them to doff their masks throughout a meeting.

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