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JOHN HOEVEN

The Democratic-controlled U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Freedom to Vote: John R. Lewis Act" on Thursday along party lines. Rep. Kelly Armstrong, R-N.D., and Rep. Michelle Fischbach, R-Minn., voted against the bill, which faces a much harder path in the gridlocked Senate.
Did everyone forget that North Dakota already has a term limits law on the books?
Minnesota Democrat and North Dakota Republican are seeking more information on a federal agency's efforts to curb carbon monoxide poisoning after a family of 7 died from a buildup of the odorless gas in their Moorhead home last month.
A mandate would affect tens of millions of American workers.

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Shaw writes, "Some recent votes in Congress remind us that democracy is very much under siege. Those votes dealt with voting rights and the alarming Jan. 6 attack."
The expanded credit benefits roughly 9 in 10 children across the country, and already data show most parents with low incomes are spending their CTC payments on food, housing, utility bills and education.
The NDHSA, a group that represents the 14 Head Start grantees in the state, is asking people to contact members of North Dakota’s congressional delegation, to speak out against the mandate.
The contract was announced in a release from Sen. John Hoeven’s office on Tuesday, Dec. 14.
Inflation in North Dakota is higher than the national average
Employers can't give employees more, while getting less, without there being some cause-and-effect ripples across our economy. We're already grappling with inflation, and this push could exacerbate that problem. Which isn't necessarily an argument against it. If we're going to contemplate this - and that ship has sailed already, I think - then we need to be thinking about the costs.

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An existential problem in modern American politics, one that is a danger to our republic, is a growing willingness to abandon, like so many looters piling into a department store, the peaceful political process in favor of violence and vicious rhetoric.
The cemetery's nearly five acres has a capacity to accept about 3,600 sets of remains, and officials said the cemetery holds about 250 burials a year.
At UND, Hoeven discussed another phase of the DOD's augmented reality program; at the airport, he heard about progress on a new crosswind runway project.

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