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THAT REMINDS ME: GF in 1911: 430 arrests, 292 for drunkenness

"Made in Grand Forks." That was the inscription on millwork done here 100 years ago on the new Presbyterian Church, City Hall, Congregational Church, St. Michael's Church, Elks Building, Bachelor's Club as well as Larimore and Corwin halls and th...

"Made in Grand Forks."

That was the inscription on millwork done here 100 years ago on the new Presbyterian Church, City Hall, Congregational Church, St. Michael's Church, Elks Building, Bachelor's Club as well as Larimore and Corwin halls and the president's house at UND.

James A. Turner & Sons boasted their handiwork in a Herald. "We employ 25 to 30 men and had a payroll last year of $23,000," the ad said.

The company urged people to order millwork ahead for the coming year.

Much building was due in 1912, the Herald reported. Several local businesses were looking to build new facilities.

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The Herald, which was sold on all trains 100 years ago, reported on the previous year. One highlight: Drunks, plain and otherwise, demanded the greatest share of attention of Grand Forks police in 1911, the newspaper reported.

Chief J.W. Lowe said arrests totaled 430 in the previous year. Of that number, 243 were for drunks. In addition, 49 were arrested for being "drunk and disorderly" accounting for 292 arrests of that nature.

There also was petty larceny, vagrancy, assault and battery, fugitive from justice and outraging public decency crimes. Other transgressions included violating city ordinance, disorderly conduct, speeding and cruelty to animals.

There were three arrests for running a house for immoral purposes, three for unlawful cohabitation and two for peddling without a license. There was an arrest for carrying a concealed weapon and one for entering a burial ground with intent to rob.

At the beginning of 1912, the Grand Forks County Board of Commissioners chose Robert Hadden, Gilby, N.D., chairman for the year to succeed Joseph Donovan.

Hadden was a pioneer member of the board, having been appointed in 1906. He was to take up the appointment of a superintendent for the County Hospital and Poor Farm.

"Two of the important features of the county's work are the conduct of the County Hospital and distribution of poor relief in the city," the Herald reported.

"From all reports, it is being taken care of in a most satisfactory manner.

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"Supt. Thomas Reidy has given splendid satisfaction.

"It is also believed the appointment of J.M. Smith of Grand Forks as a poor commissioner for the city of Grand Forks has been a splendid move.

"The city has spent a considerable amount this past year on poor relief."

Taking in a 33-mile radius, Grand Forks and the surrounding area had a population of 64,101 100 years ago. The figures were compiled by C.W. Graves of the Commercial Club.

Banks in Grand Forks at the time included First National, Union National and Scandinavian American. And there was an ad in the Herald saying, "We pay 4 percent on savings deposits. First National Bank, East Grand Forks. G.R. Jacobi, cashier."

Grand Forks Hotels in January 1912 were listed on the Herald's "Wants" page, as follows:

- Hotel Northern -- Dining room service or cafeteria lunch. Modified plan with rooms 50 cents to $1. Rooms with private bath, $1.25 to $2. H.N. Wells, proprietor.

- The Frederick -- Finest European Hotel in city. Rooms, $1 and up.

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- The Columbia -- European, opposite Great Northern depot. Rooms, 50 cents and up.

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