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THAT REMINDS ME: 'Can't fish. Gone shopping,' said anglers in 1988

Early in December 25 years ago, the Herald carried a warning for anglers to beware of thin ice. Thin and dangerous ice still covered many lakes and rivers of North Dakota and Minnesota, said a story by Kevin Grinde of the Herald.

Marilyn Hagerty
Longtime Herald columnist Marilyn Hagerty and her review of Olive Garden going viral is the Herald's 2012 story of the year. Grand Forks Herald photo by John Stennes.

Early in December 25 years ago, the Herald carried a warning for anglers to beware of thin ice. Thin and dangerous ice still covered many lakes and rivers of North Dakota and Minnesota, said a story by Kevin Grinde of the Herald.

Wildlife agencies in both states were warning anglers, hunters and trappers to be extremely careful on seemingly frozen bodies of water.

Dean Ash, area fisheries manager for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources said, "Early season fishing is always the best, but it is not worth risking your life."

In other news 25 years ago, American Crystal Sugar celebrated its 15th anniversary by announcing its best year ever. More than 600 farmers owned the cooperative. Total sugar production was at a record 17.4 million tons -- a fourth of all beet sugar produced in the United States.

In early December, the ads for Christmas shopping were all around. A toy sale at Home of Economy featured a Chatter Telephone for $5.88, a cash register for $11.88 and a Tonka Maple Town Forest Train set for $15.88.

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At Columbia Mall in December 1988, John Barleycorn restaurant was taking reservations for Christmas parties. Grand Forks Goodribs restaurant was offering Christmas gift certificates.

Marvin Windows of Warroad, Minn., announced it would distribute $20.2 million in profit sharing to employees. That was almost three times as much as the previous year, when $7.7 million was distributed.

The additional revenue in 1988 came from a source of income that Jack Marvin declined to identify. It was reported that 2,850 Marvin employees received around $7,000 apiece before Christmas 1988.

• Oat bran was hard to find in local and area markets after nutritionists started saying it could lower cholesterol levels. The cost was up to $2.49 for 14 ounces at one market in Grand Forks. Before that, the price was in the range of $1.44 to $1.77 for 16 ounces.

• Grand Forks might be hearing more about a new business called Aerospace Training Group or ATG, the Herald reported. The business was a two-way partnership between the private airline industry and UND, which had a multi-million dollar contract to train airline pilots for China Airlines.

Names in the news 25 years ago:

• Samuel Paletz took down his shingle, capping out a 65-year law career in Grand Forks. He was a 1924 graduate of UND.

"I think I was vigorous in court," Paletz said as he retired.

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"I didn't mumble. I let 'em have both barrels."

True to form, his departure from the bar was reported to be as blunt as ever. He called District Judge Kirk Smith to say he was "hanging it up." Period.

• Martin Osnowitz and Curt Olsson, two longtime business men, also were hanging it up. Osnowitz closed the Mary-Elizabeth Shop downtown. Olsson closed Ruettell's men's clothing store, which had been downtown before moving to Columbia Mall.

• Scott Guldseth decided to leave Louisiana State, where he had been recruited to play basketball. He was returning to play for UND. The 6-foot, 5-inch guard-forward had been chosen North Dakota's Mr. Basketball for 1988 when he was a player from Edinburg, N.D.

In an interview in the Herald, he said he guessed Louisiana was a long way from home.

Related Topics: FISHINGWILDLIFE
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