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OUR OPINION: Welcome to June

Let's get the month off to a great start by recognizing a nice series of good-news events that unfolded last week. ** Fifteen National Intercollegiate Flying Association championships! What an achievement for UND's flying team, and how proud UND ...

Let's get the month off to a great start by recognizing a nice series of good-news events that unfolded last week.

** Fifteen National Intercollegiate Flying Association championships! What an achievement for UND's flying team, and how proud UND aerospace school founder John Odegard would be.

The flying team competes in such events as precision landings, navigation and "message drop," in which a student drops a container into an oil drum from 200 feet above the ground.

Every year, the competition is tough, including teams from such famous flight-training schools as the U.S. Air Force Academy and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. But every year, UND's team holds its own among the world's best -- and more often than not, takes the top prize.

Congratulations. What an inspiring performance.

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** When Daniel Hauser's mother fled with him to California, the Herald and most other newspapers said she was wrong. Chemotherapy is so likely to help a boy with Daniel's cancer -- and death is so likely to result in chemo's absence -- that the state even has a right to step in.

But as it turned out, the state did not have to force Colleen Hauser to return with Daniel to Minnesota. She brought him back on her own -- an action, given her religious and other beliefs, that was a tremendously difficult and yet praiseworthy thing to do.

Hauser deserves great credit for recognizing the power of modern medicine and of science to give Daniel his best possible odds.

By the way, a Web site has been set up to help raise money for Daniel's cancer treatments. The Web site is www.dannyhauser.com .

** Roxana Saberi's book about Iran promises to be a great read.

Saberi, safe and sound back in the U.S., would like to return to Fargo and write a book, the North Dakota native told ABC News' Diane Sawyer last week.

It"s sure to be well worth reading, because Saberi can bring such a fascinating perspective to bear. Her father hails from Iran. Her mother is Japanese. Saberi grew up in Fargo but spent several years as a reporter and observer in Iran -- much longer than most visitors from the U.S.

The extended stay gave Saberi the chance to know Iran much more deeply and intimately than Americans typically are able to. Add the fact that Saberi also spent 100 days in an Iranian prison, and you've got the makings of a very insightful book about one of the least-understood but most important countries on Earth.

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** Then there's the news about the Lamoureux twins, Jocelyne and Monique -- two high-performance spark plugs who're sure to rev up the UND women's hockey team and power excitement around the region as well.

The twins are transferring to UND after spending a year at the University of Minnesota. Again, what a tribute to UND their decision is; what a testimony to the quality and appeal of the school.

And what a great time fans will have over the next few years, as people get to know these remarkable young women and their exceptional and inspiring family. At last, women's hockey promises to come into its own in Grand Forks.

-- Tom Dennis for the Herald

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