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Letter: Regarding Froma Harrop’s recent column in the Herald

National columnist Froma Harrop on Sunday declared in the Herald, “The republic will survive drag queens.” It's not a bad question, though. Will it?

Letter to the editor FSA
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National columnist Froma Harrop on Sunday declared in the Herald, “The republic will survive drag queens.”

It's not a bad question, though. Will it?

For answers, one might look to the 1930s work of Oxford University anthropologist, J.D. Unwin. He looked at 86 widely-varied civilizations and found that when sexual hedonism overtook a nation, a type of “human entropy” led to a gradual descent into disorder and collapse in as little as three generations.

A better question, though, might be to ask why a sector of the population so desperately wants to trivialize and mainstream drag culture and why is there such a not-so-subtle attempt to bring children into this unnatural voyeuristic world? It seems not dissimilar to the almost wild response some Floridians had when a measure was on the table to delay sex education in that state until after third grade. Why, one might ask, would third grade (eight years old) be considered too late – and too late for what? What is it about introducing sexual content to younger and younger ages that so energizes a segment of the population? I would suggest it has its roots in the dark works of John Money and Claude Migeon, which you can read for yourself if you’ve the stomach for it.

For the concerned citizen, I would refer readers to the contemporary writings of feminist Genevieve Gluck at Reduxx, who has carefully addressed the dark objectives of the drag queen phenomena and the publicly-uncontestable advancement of transgenderism, which winds itself through pornography, the mainstreaming of pedophilia, and the objectification of women in these performances by reducing them to any number of sexual stereotypes.

Related Topics: LETTERS TO THE EDITORLGBTQ
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