ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Letter: Lawmakers, don’t meddle in higher ed

Lawmakers in Bismarck are meddling in academic affairs.

Letter to the editor FSA

As a student at UND, I assumed I would have the ability to make educational and career choices that fit with my interests and goals. I assumed that my professors, who are experts in their fields, would decide how content is covered in class. It appears that I was wrong. Lawmakers in Bismarck are meddling in academic affairs.

The Myrdal amendment on SB 2030 places restrictions on university sponsorships, partnerships and grants. This will not only affect me as a current student, but also future students at any North Dakota public higher education institution. If we allow lawmakers to set this dangerous precedent, where will they stop? If a student wants to pursue an internship with Planned Parenthood because it fits with their career goals, is it the place of the state legislature to prevent that from happening?

The North Dakota State Board of Higher Education has policies in place to protect academic freedom and student choice. In fact, faculty have a responsibility to engage students in scholarship and research free from administrative and government interference. I hope lawmakers vote against any attempt to interfere with the education provided by the great institutions in this state.

Jacey Spaeth, Grand Forks

What To Read Next
I am writing to bring attention to the importance of mental health and the need for more resources and support for those struggling.
I want to commend Senators Sean Cleary and Dick Dever and Rep. Josh Boschee for introducing a bill to stabilize pensions for our state and local workers.
On Jan. 10, NDDPI, and the North Dakota Governor’s Office, announced they partnered with Western Governors University and had awarded the ESSER dollars to a college outside of North Dakota.
As the principal of St. Michael’s Catholic School in Grand Forks, I am compelled to bring clarity and correction to the letter to the editor titled “Voucher plan would hurt public schools."