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Letter: Journalistic malpractice doesn’t go unnoticed

From abortion to recession, border security to crime, energy policy to inflation, the partisan framing of major issues by most corporate media are calculated efforts to influence you and define debate.

Letter to the editor FSA
We are part of The Trust Project.

Anchors and newspaper editors have a bad habit of skipping over their own approval ratings.

According to Gallup’s latest survey on “Confidence in Major U.S. Institutions” the American people's trust in news outlets has hit an historic low. Just 11 percent of respondents have “quite a lot” of trust in television news. Newspapers aren't much better at 16 percent. Television news is now considered the second least-trusted institution in America, after Congress.

From abortion to recession, border security to crime, energy policy to inflation, the partisan framing of major issues by most corporate media are calculated efforts to influence you and define debate. The recent demise of Roe has brought an elevated level of media bias and not surprisingly, the pro-life perspective has been rare or embargoed.

Corporate media have a long-standing history of excluding any mention of the unborn in their reporting; imagine the intentional exclusion of any reference to slaves when covering the issue of slavery by then media. Their exclusion includes banning images of the unborn, denying established science of our once-in-a-lifetime existence before birth, and a refusal to report on “how” the unborn are aborted - through dismemberment, vacuum suction, or saline solution. To do so would expose the “choice” act for what it is and bring a human equation, now missing, to the forefront.

Gallup’s polling clearly demonstrates that journalistic malpractice is not going unnoticed.

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