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Letter: Don’t worry, Grand Forks. The Air Force base is safe and secure

The worry over spying on GFAFB by Chinese nationals working for Fufeng, if this plant is built, is over-blown hyperbole and not worth mentioning again.

Letter to the editor FSA
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I have been following the arguments for and against the wet corn milling plant that the Fufeng Corporation based in the People’s Republic of China wants to build and operate in Grand Forks. One of the arguments brought forward by some of the letter writers is against this Chinese corporation owning and operating a plant close to the Grand Forks Air Force Base. The potential for surveillance and spying left me shaking my head and laughing.

Grand Forks Air Force Base has been in operation since Jan. 28, 1957. Its location is well known to everyone who can pick up a free road map of North Dakota or use any internet search engine. My father was stationed at this base for the last six years of his 20-year Air Force career as a member of the missile wing’s security police squadron tasked with providing security for the missile sites and the base itself. He and all other Security Forces personnel, past and present, put their lives on the line every hour of every day to keep the property and assets of our military installations secure from intrusion and dangerous threats. Plus, the intelligence services of the Department of Defense, the National Security Agency and the Central Intelligence Agency are in place to safeguard the assets and missions of all military installations, wherever they may be. Don’t worry folks, our base is secure.

The University of North Dakota has hosted a number of students and faculty members from the People’s Republic of China over the past decade or more. How many of those were in aviation and other high-tech disciplines that caused you to be as alarmed as you claim to be now? The worry over spying on GFAFB by Chinese nationals working for Fufeng, if this plant is built, is over-blown hyperbole and not worth mentioning again.

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