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Attempts to steal fuel from Mexican pipeline set off massive fireball, killing at least 66

Letter: A press pass is still a privilege

To the editor,

It's hilarious.

Hypothetical: Donald Trump decides to hold a press conference. Not in the usual setting, but in a room half as big. It can't hold as many journalists. Who gets in and who doesn't? Or do they all get in and have to stand or sit in each other's laps? Or is there now a rule that the president must hold press conferences in a setting that requires X amount of space? It's absurd.

The court ruling isn't about CNN reporter Jim Acosta's right to ask a question; it's about the president being required to listen. A press pass is a pass. It's permission being granted. Not any and every Tom, Dick and Mary has a right to sit or stand in a particular location. A pass is a privilege; someone in authority said yes, you have the privilege of attendance. That privilege need not to have been granted to begin with. If "no" was never an option, a pass is redundant, meaningless.

Yes, I know the president is conducting the people's business, but he, too, is a citizen who need not be "Accosted" by someone demanding and requiring someone to answer the question put in so many ways: "Are you a son of a b---?"

When self-serving people speak of the Constitution and freedom of the press, I sometimes roll my eyes and think, really? Wrap yourself in the flag. It's often the refuge of a scoundrel.

Ron Schmidt

Tolna, N.D.

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