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LETTER: Many in N.D. count on EAS flights

I just read the Herald's editorial about the daily flights between Denver and both Devils Lake and Jamestown, N.D. ("Essential Air Service needs flight plan for reform," Page A4, March 5).

Before the newspaper condemned the service based on a government report, maybe a local input should have been sought.

My husband and I flew this route in February on our way elsewhere using Denver as our hub for further travels. We flew Saturday, Feb. 14, early morning out of Devils Lake.

The plane left not full. I remember because we took the opportunity to spread out so my husband and I were each sitting in a seat without a seatmate. But that quickly changed when we landed in Jamestown. Many people boarded, and we sat in our assigned seats because it was very full.

Returning from Denver back the same route on Sunday, Feb. 22, we left Denver not filled, so we spread apart again to not have a seat mate. When we reached Jamestown, I expected no one to board. Why would someone board to fly the short distance to Devils Lake, I thought?

Well, surprisingly, there were many boardings -- perhaps eight to 10 people.

After getting to Devils Lake and waiting for our luggage, we visited with a man from Denver who was traveling to Park River, N.D., to visit his mother with health problems. He loved this route and said he would definitely choose it in the future over flying into Fargo.

For those of us with family in the western part of the United States, the airline we need to get where we are going is United. Without Devils Lake, we would be driving to Fargo, as Grand Forks offers no United service.

We give two thumbs up to Devils Lake air service.

Rita Vaughn

Cavalier, ND..

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