ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Letter: Trump's pride goeth before a fall

R.J. Ogaard opines that this election is about the Constitution and the Supreme Court ("Totalitarianism or constitutionalism?", letter, Oct. 20, Page A4). I agree.

R.J. Ogaard opines that this election is about the Constitution and the Supreme Court ("Totalitarianism or constitutionalism?", letter, Oct. 20, Page A4). I agree.

On Feb. 13, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly.

On March 15, President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland to replace Scalia.

Anticipating a Republican triumph in November, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell decreed that because 2016 was an election year, the Senate must await the nominee of Obama's successor.

Irony of ironies, Scalia's avowed "originalism"-that is to say, law based on identifiable original meaning or intent in the Constitution-would require Obama to invoke Article II, Section 2 of the document and designate a nominee. Then at a timely hearing, senators would advise and consent, or not.

ADVERTISEMENT

Alas, seven months after McConnell denied Garland his hearing, Donald Trump is tempting evangelicals with an artful deal: The presidency in exchange for acceptable court nominees.

Savior, or scourge? Deal, or no deal?

In "Hamlet," Shakespeare's hero observes, "There's a divinity that shapes our ends, / Rough-hew them how we will."

Order is sundered when Claudius usurps the throne and, turn by turn, dooms the entire hierarchy of Denmark. Ultimately, though, he is dispatched and a legitimate king crowned - intimations of divine ascendancy.

Scheming to control the U.S. Supreme Court, Republicans have usurped the Constitution, unleashing incivility and outright hectoring.

Even so, there's a divinity shaping our ends. Indeed, our land is astir, and restoration of rightful order appears imminent.

Donald Bruce Beard

Banning, Calif.

ADVERTISEMENT

Beard is a native of Reynolds, N.D.. and a graduate of UND.

What To Read Next