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Letter: Port misses mark on Charlottesville

To the editor, On Aug. 14, Rob Port opined that Charlottesville was a "clash of identity politics" between the Unite the Right movement and the countering left-wing antifa movement, as if there was some sort of shared blame in what happened. Port...

To the editor,

On Aug. 14, Rob Port opined that Charlottesville was a "clash of identity politics" between the Unite the Right movement and the countering left-wing antifa movement, as if there was some sort of shared blame in what happened. Port's opinion takes President Trump's failed condemnation of the KKK and neo-Nazis narrative, what used to be a political no-brainer, in which all sides are at fault, and runs with it.

To be clear, this isn't about identity politics; it's about what is right and what is evil. There was but one side marching flags with swastikas down the street. There was but one side "seig-heiling." There was but one side adorning Klan robes and Nazi uniforms.

There was but one side that rammed a car into a group of peaceful protesters, killing Heather Heyer and injuring dozens. Ms. Heyer wasn't a fascist, or anarchist, she was a paralegal. Pretty reasonable, in my opinion. And to use your platform to shame both sides, as if there is some sort of middle ground here, is unconscionable.

Trump's failure to condemn the morons in charge of this protest (read: Nazis) and Port's opinion that everyone there is to blame, is just a hamfisted way to not upset those who support their shared ethos most ardently.

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While I agree with Port that some factions of extreme left-wing ideologues ironically mirror much of what they claim to combat, I think Charlottesville was a pretty clear cut situation: you're either for Nazis and the KKK, or you're not.

For a political faction that has no trouble saying "radical Islamic terrorism" and proclaims to "Make America Great Again," it's pretty disturbing that they aren't adamantly anti-Nazi. I mean, we literally fought a war over that, and if I recall, we were on the America-is-pretty-great side.

Any red-blooded American, Republican or Democrat, should be incensed that people claiming to be patriots are marching swastikas down the street. You don't get to be a Nazi and an American patriot, that's not how that works. It sure didn't take far-right Senators Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz long to acknowledge that Nazis and the KKK are terrible, and the reason Charlottesville happened. Why can't President Trump and Rob Port do the same?

Patrick Rosenquist

Fargo

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