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LETTER: Let wolves 'determine their own suitable territory'

Thank you for the story, "Wolf ruling could affect Minnesota livestock" (Page B3, Jan. 21). Minnesota's wolf recovery plan appeases those who wish to hunt and trap wolves for trophies. The spilling of blood, inflicting of torture with traps and t...

Thank you for the story, "Wolf ruling could affect Minnesota livestock" (Page B3, Jan. 21).

Minnesota's wolf recovery plan appeases those who wish to hunt and trap wolves for trophies. The spilling of blood, inflicting of torture with traps and the killing of pups and pregnant females is simply for the amusement of special interests, who enjoy boasting about the trophies they claim.

The state's goal of 1,600 wolves is unacceptable and unrealistic. To keep wolves in a small area undermines their recovery. Wolves are territorial and need to determine their own suitable territory.

Minnesota has 86,943 square miles; there is plenty of room for more wolves and a chance at full recovery.

Predators as a whole are only responsible for an insignificant percentage of livestock losses. The main causes are illness, injuries, birth defects, fires and weather conditions.

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In most states, wolves have vanished, surviving only in a small percentage of their original range. But states with and without wolves both suffer the same livestock losses; the slaughtering of wolves is unjustifiable.

Ranchers should be required to use fencing, dogs, lighting and so on to deter wolves away from herds. The grazing of herds in known wolf territory or on public, taxpayer lands where wolves are supposed to be should be banned.

Leaving a carcass to rot in a field should be a fining offence, for this is a major cause of wolves approaching herds.

Wolves avoid humans; we should give them the same respect. Wolves are intelligent. They'll learn to avoid herds and keep other predators out of their established territory, thus providing safety for herds.

Wolves are an essential part on America's wilderness. Man must learn to adjust to them, using common sense and science, not medieval barbaric means to destroy that which we choose not to understand.

Irene Sette

New Milford, N.J.

Related Topics: WILDLIFE
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