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Letter: Golf course's closure lands diversity in bunker

"Diversity and inclusion." Hear about that all the time, mostly as the topic emanates from UND. If I understand the concept, it means that people of all races as well as creeds and other "orientations" interact with no acrimony arising from their...

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"Diversity and inclusion." Hear about that all the time, mostly as the topic emanates from UND.

If I understand the concept, it means that people of all races as well as creeds and other "orientations" interact with no acrimony arising from their differences.

Interesting concept. Now, where might we see this in action in our community?

Why, there it is, right there at Ray Richards Golf Course. In my years playing at the course, I have met, played and become friends with people of many-if not every-personal persuasion.

In a recent informal tournament, my three teammates were a black golfer from Texas, a Navajo Indian from the southwest and a white guy from North Carolina (I'm a 63-year-old white male who also grew up south of the Mason/Dixon Line).

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I have also trammeled the course with people of Hispanic and Asian heritage and have played with golfers ranging in age from high school students to octogenarians, men and women alike.

What we all had in common was a love for the game of golf. A more perfect mechanism to bring people together would be very hard to find.

But now UND, while espousing the worth of "diversity and inclusion," has seen fit to announce that the course will close Nov. 1 for good. Leads me to wonder if any of the UND diversity and inclusion advocates (or any other high-level admin type, for that matter) have seen fit to ever visit the course. Or maybe diversity and inclusion occurs only on campus, in little meeting rooms with rainbow banners and pictures of unicorns. Too bad, because Ray Richards Golf Course had the real thing going on.

Well, maybe the U should hire more deputy assistant associate vice-presidents of diversity and inclusion.

The current crop wouldn't recognize it if it hit 'em square in the face.

Jack Hammen

Grand Forks

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