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Letter: Electoral College spreads voting power

In his letter, Doug Sorenson says we should scrap the Electoral College because it lets a president be elected who didn't win the popular vote ("Get rid of unfair, undemocratic Electoral College," Page A4, Nov. 17).

In his letter, Doug Sorenson says we should scrap the Electoral College because it lets a president be elected who didn't win the popular vote ("Get rid of unfair, undemocratic Electoral College," Page A4, Nov. 17).

Sorenson says the Electoral College does not elect the candidate who is the choice of the people. I respectfully disagree.

Sorenson claims the Electoral College is undemocratic, but what he and many others forget is that we don't live in a democracy. We live in a constitutional or representative republic.

The Founding Fathers set up the Electoral College for the same reason that they set up Congress the way they did. They wanted to give all states more of an equal voice.

What the Founders knew then, and what we see now, is that if everything went by the popular vote, those areas with the most people would have total control.

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So, without the Electoral College, each candidate's focus would be on the big cities. They would spend all of their time in places like New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston and Detroit.

You'd never see them in Iowa, Wyoming, the Dakotas or other rural states. Why would any candidate waste time and money in those low-population places?

The Founders did not want a system in which the most populated areas controlled everything. That's why we have an Electoral College, because it makes every state factor into the election's outcome.

Despite their relatively few electoral votes, states such as Iowa and New Hampshire still get fought over by candidates, because their Electoral College votes could make the difference between winning and losing.

That is how we make sure every vote counts-not just those in the cities.

David Wyman

Larimore, N.D.

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