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Letter: A-bomb was fear in past; now it's a shooter

To the editor, A letter to my teaching colleagues at colleges across North Dakota: I have this nagging feeling that our students have picked up a fear that simmers just beneath the surface, sort of like a low grade fever. I recognize it because I...

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Mandalay Bay opened on March 2, 1999, in the new era of the Vegas mega-resort. Photo by Bloomberg's David Paul Morris

To the editor,

A letter to my teaching colleagues at colleges across North Dakota: I have this nagging feeling that our students have picked up a fear that simmers just beneath the surface, sort of like a low grade fever.

I recognize it because I had it too, when I was a child, but it was my students' reaction to the Las Vegas shooting that triggered a relapse.

Today's students fear a shooter in the classroom, in a theater, or wherever they gather.

For my generation the fear was being blown to smithereens by a communist A-bomb.

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A salve is and was applied to both generations: fight back by throwing books, or put your head between your knees and pray - either way, the feeling is you are a sitting duck.

This fear does discriminate; some students are more susceptible and it creates a barrier to their learning.

There is a tool that address discrimination, the 1972 federal law, Title IX. Does this law apply here? I don't know, it's novel, but why not?

Look, I'm no lawyer and some days can't find my head to put on my hat but the smart people are out there. Fear of the bomb created a generational neurosis, maybe we can do something about this fear before it spreads further.

Jay Johnson

Langdon, N.D.

Johnson is a faculty member at Lake Region State College.

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