ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Janne Myrdal, Park River, N.D., column: Make health care reform 'sound American' next time

By Janne Myrdal PARK RIVER, N.D. -- What is Rep. Earl Pomeroy, D-N.D., waiting for in the health care debate? Constituents' voices from North Dakota? No, he has received an enormous number of e-mails and phone calls, most of them against the curr...

By Janne Myrdal

PARK RIVER, N.D. -- What is Rep. Earl Pomeroy, D-N.D., waiting for in the health care debate?

Constituents' voices from North Dakota? No, he has received an enormous number of e-mails and phone calls, most of them against the current health care bill

Changes to the bill? No, it's the full Senate bill that the senators passed on Christmas Eve.

Offers from the White House? Hmm -- to be continued.

ADVERTISEMENT

So, what could it be?

Pomeroy voted for the House's health care reform bill. Then, in January, he said clearly and publicly that he would not vote for the Senate bill. He also told members of Concerned Women for America of North Dakota that he would not vote for any bill that included public funding for abortion.

Well, it is the Senate's exact bill, the one that includes funding for elective abortions, that now will have to be voted on in the House in order for it to reach the president's desk.

Pomeroy also said recently that this health care reform bill was not perfect and that changes would have to be made. So the question is, Why vote for a law that needs to be fixed?

This legislation does not have the support of the majority of the American people, and it's supported even less in North Dakota. The ratio in North Dakota probably is something like 8-2 against.

Congressman, are you going to listen to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi or to the hard-working North Dakotans who are getting tired of you bending to the Potomac winds of power?

In my native country of Norway, each citizen contributes about 8 percent to 11 percent of his or her income to the medical care they get for "free." That's in a nation of 4.5 million people and with an enormous national surplus.

Even so, the medical system in Norway still is slowly running out of cash, and the waiting lists are long. Believe me, I know.

ADVERTISEMENT

Compare that to the U.S., a nation of 300 million-plus people and that now is trillions of dollars in deficit. Tell me this health care reform will not raise taxes.

Furthermore, the reform also will create more than 100 new bureaucracies, double the premiums for under-30-year-olds, mandate everyone to buy health insurance, penalize marriage while encouraging couples to "shack up," cut $135 billion from hospitals serving seniors, $15 billion from nursing homes and nearly $8 billion from hospices.

Then, of course, there is the issue that may kill the bill: federal funding for abortion and $11 billion in support of Community Health Centers, some which are run by Planned Parenthood.

There is a lot more, including the process of passing this legislation (which frankly has stunk and stinks more by the hour). New rules and deals actually are being made as I write this.

But to sum up, this bill is not about health care at all. It is about control and mandates.

If passed, it will be a promise fulfilled by President Barack Obama to "fundamentally" change this nation, and not for the better. And that is really the final goal of legislation such as this.

It is about changing America into a European-style socialist nation, with the government exercising cradle (if you are allowed to even be born) to grave control -- a big giant bureaucracy for life.

When I was speaking about Obamacare the other day with a Norwegian physician (and not a conservative one), he exclaimed, "Boy, that does not sound American."

ADVERTISEMENT

What a statement! Even those watching overseas see America as a land of freedom and liberty, of personal responsibility and independence. After all, France gave us a Statue of Liberty, not a statue of entitlements.

That, congressman, should guide you to a solid "no" vote on the current health care bills. Start over from scratch with common-sense freedom principles, listen to your constituents -- and let's make it sound American this time.

Myrdal is state director of Concerned Women for America of North Dakota.

What To Read Next