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Plain Talk: Rep. Armstrong talks Biden's first year, Russia's aggression in Ukraine, and China

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U.S. Rep. Kelly Armstrong speaks to students at West Fargo Sheyenne High School on Thursday, April 1, 2021. David Samson / The Forum
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MINOT, N.D. — I'll admit, I wanted to use this interview to push Congressman Kelly Armstrong, a fellow baseball nut, to pass legislation to end Major League Baseball's ongoing lockout.

But I controlled myself.

What kind of conservative would I be if I was pushing for that sort of federal intervention? Principles must trump emotion, which is something we could all do well to keep in mind a bit more these days.

What Armstrong and I did talk about was President Joe Biden's first year in office. As you might expect, this Republican congressman isn't impressed. He's also not impressed with Biden's leadership with Russia. Armstrong told me he hopes Biden is successful in handling the crisis in Ukraine, but he's afraid we're in for another debacle like the one Biden presided over in Afghanistan.

We also talked about why it's important for America to counter the influence of countries like China and Russia, even when it's not always economically important to do so.

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Opinion by Rob Port
Rob Port is a news reporter, columnist, and podcast host for the Forum News Service. He has an extensive background in investigations and public records. He has covered political events in North Dakota and the upper Midwest for two decades. Reach him at rport@forumcomm.com. Click here to subscribe to his Plain Talk podcast.
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