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Plain Talk: Cara Mund, Rick Becker, recreational marijuana, and Liz Cheney

On this episode of Plain Talk, we discuss the jolt of excitement North Dakota's general election ballot just received from a couple of independent candidates, and the approval of a measure legalizing recreational marijuana. We also discuss Rep. Liz Cheney losing in the Wyoming primary.

Mund
Cara Mund meets with residents as she collects signatures Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2022, in West Acres Mall, Fargo, to be placed on the ballot for the U.S. House of Representatives as an independent.
Michael Vosburg/The Forum
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MINOT, N.D. — North Dakota's general election got a lot more interesting over the last couple of weeks.

First, Cara Mund, a former Miss America, jumped into the U.S. House race as an independent to take on Republican incumbent Kelly Armstrong and Democratic-NPL challenger Mark Haugen. Then state Rep. Rick Becker went back on his statements in support of the decision of Republican delegates at the NDGOP state convention, which chose incumbent Sen. John Hoeven over him, and re-entered the U.S. Senate race.

Then the secretary of state approved the signatures for a ballot measure legalizing medical marijuana.

That's a lot of things to talk about, but on this episode of Plain Talk, fill-in co-host Jamie Selzler and I tackle them all. David Owen, a representative of New Approach North Dakota, the group backing the marijuana measure, joined to talk about how they were able to run a successful petition campaign, and they'll win over North Dakota voters to their cause. Also, Jamie and I discuss Mund, Becker, and Rep. Liz Cheney's defeat in the Wyoming primary.

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"We have polled three times since Cara has gotten in the race. We have used three different polling companies to ensure we are getting the most diverse/accurate information," Armstrong told me of his surveys. "We don't do it for a press release. We do it so that we know how to move forward with our campaign. The only way to do that well is if we can trust the data."
The last thing we need is a bunch of opportunistic politicians jumping into the debate over carbon pipelines not to protect their constituents but to exact revenge on their political enemies.
Ben Hanson, a candidate for the Cass County Commission, and Sen. Kevin Cramer join this episode of Plain Talk.
It's time for state officials to get serious about this. There are too many red flags, too many convenient connections between family, political allies, and business partners, for us to believe that this deal was above board.
If we don't like pink, I'm open to another color. Like baby blue. Or a nice aquamarine color. We can workshop it. Whatever we come up with, it should serve as a reminder that law enforcement should be about safety, both for the cops and for the public, and not some action-movie fantasy.
Did Rep. Jason Dockter, a Bismarck-area Republican, really think that this sort of dealing, assuming it's all technically in compliance with state law, would pass the smell test with the public? If he didn't, he's a fool, and if he did, you have to wonder why he went ahead with it anyway.

Opinion by Rob Port
Rob Port is a news reporter, columnist, and podcast host for the Forum News Service. He has an extensive background in investigations and public records. He has covered political events in North Dakota and the upper Midwest for two decades. Reach him at rport@forumcomm.com. Click here to subscribe to his Plain Talk podcast.
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