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Plain Talk: Can Republicans and Democrats find common ground on a red flag bill?

Rep. Karla Rose Hanson, a Democrat from Fargo, joins this episode of Plain Talk to discuss guns and gun control. Also on this episode, Wednesday co-host Chad Oban and I talk about out predictions for the upcoming June primaries.

Karla Rose Hanson speaks during a meeting Friday, Oct. 13, 2017, at North Dakota State University of the N.D. chapter of Ready to Run, a group that encourages women to participate in public service.
Karla Rose Hanson speaks during a meeting Friday, Oct. 13, 2017, at North Dakota State University of the N.D. chapter of Ready to Run, a group that encourages women to participate in public service.
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
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MINOT, N.D. — In 2019, state Rep. Karla Rose Hanson, a Democrat from Fargo, introduced a red flag bill. It would have created a judicial process through which guns could be taken away from people exhibiting troubling behavior.

I was among the many critics of the bill, and it failed decisively, early in the session, in the House.

But is there merit to the idea, if not Hanson's specific bill?

She joined this episode of Plain Talk to discuss it with me along with Wednesday co-host Chad Oban. We talked about how we can set up a process to get guns out of the hands of dangerous people while simultaneously ensuring the process isn't abused, or that it doesn't deny responsible gun owners their rights.

We also had a lengthy discussion about gun politics, which like so many hot-button political issues, are another front in America's endless culture wars.

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Chad and I also discussed the threats made against myself and my family recently, which I've written about, and our predictions for the outcome of the state's upcoming June primary vote.

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Opinion by Rob Port
Rob Port is a news reporter, columnist, and podcast host for the Forum News Service. He has an extensive background in investigations and public records. He has covered political events in North Dakota and the upper Midwest for two decades. Reach him at rport@forumcomm.com. Click here to subscribe to his Plain Talk podcast.
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