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COLUMNIST MARILYN HAGERTY: UND vs. USD, 75 years ago

Some say history repeats itself. An optimist then can look back to the basketball game here 75 years ago between the Coyotes of University of South Dakota and the Sioux of UND. At that time, the Sioux defeated the Coyotes 37-25 in what was descri...

Some say history repeats itself. An optimist then can look back to the basketball game here 75 years ago between the Coyotes of University of South Dakota and the Sioux of UND. At that time, the Sioux defeated the Coyotes 37-25 in what was described as a ragged game. It was the third conference win for Clem Letich's cagers.

The Coyotes will be back in Grand Forks on Saturday for men's and women's games in what's being called the "Big Meltdown."

There was more than Sioux basketball around Grand Forks 75 years ago in January. The Harlem Globe Trotters also came to town and staged a game with Grand Forks athletes in the Central High School gymnasium. The All American Turkey Show was held here, and there was a Roosevelt Birthday Ball on Jan. 30.

The mercury plunged to 32 below on Jan. 22, 1935, and many roads were blocked. But more than 400 entries were reported from the nation's fowl display here under manager George Hackett. Crews directed by Barney Hagerty set up coops in the city auditorium for the show. Mrs. John Allen of Radium, Minn., was elected president of the Turkey Hen Club, an active organization that held events year round in this area.

Mayor E.A. Fladland spoke at the reopening of the redecorated Metropolitan and the return of vaudeville to the theater. At the end of the month, the President's Birthday Ball was described as a "gala event at the States Theater." R.N. Davies, editor of the Herald, was general chairman. It was one of 7,000 in the nation marking the 53rd birthday of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was regarded as a benefit event for local relief funds.

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The New Deal proposed by President Roosevelt was in the news 75 years ago, and he was asking that $800 million dollars be spent for work relief programs. He said they would take people off the dole. . . . People were also wrapped up in the story of the trial of Bruno Richard Hauptmann after the kidnapping of the baby of Charles and Anne Lindberg. . . . And there was turmoil in Bismarck, where Thomas Moodie was declared governor on Jan. 7, 1935. That was followed by Nonpartisan League forces refusing to recognize him and asking for a proof of his citizenship. . . . Amelia Earhart Putnam departed Honolulu to make the first solo flight from Hawaii to California . . .

Although the 1930s are remembered for the drought and depression, there were prospects for better business in Grand Forks 75 years ago. The North Dakota State Mill here had 700,000 bushels of wheat in storage. Some 2,700 bushels of flour were being produced daily until Nov. 27 when lake shipping closed.

Northwest Airlines took over the airmail route from Chicago to Pembina, N.D., through Grand Forks. Delivery of mail to the university station was going out by truck, according to J.H. McNicol, the postmaster.

Iver Johnson was elected chairman of Grand Forks County Commissioners, succeeding John Nuss. Nicolai Eddie, Northwood, N.D., succeeded A.O. Trageton, Northwood, on the board.

Related Topics: HISTORY
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