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COLUMNIST MARILYN HAGERTY: 'Clang, clang, clang' went GF-UND trolley

he first streetcar trip from Grand Forks to the Grand Forks College (now known as UND) was made at 7 p.m. Jan. 6, 1910. The streetcar would be running the distance of four miles for a nickel, manager Thomas Campbell said. Work was progressing on ...

he first streetcar trip from Grand Forks to the Grand Forks College (now known as UND) was made at 7 p.m. Jan. 6, 1910.

The streetcar would be running the distance of four miles for a nickel, manager Thomas Campbell said. Work was progressing on a car barn on South Third Street.

With two new cars on order, Grand Forks Street Car Co. was rapidly assuming metropolitan proportions, according to the Herald.

** T.H. Johnson, a prominent farmer from Allendale Township, N.D., and living 15 miles southwest of Grand Forks, was in the city discussing an interesting manner of feeding prairie chickens throughout the winter.

Johnson, who had lived in Grand Forks County since 1882, said he'd never seen a winter in which there was so little for the birds to eat. It was not uncommon to find birds dead, although he had not seen dead prairie chickens. He said farmers could keep the prairie chickens alive by letting them live in cornfields without molestation.

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In his long residence in this area, Johnson had never shot a prairie chicken.

** Grand Forks residents were keeping an eye on the large amount of coal being used during the winter of 1910. Dealers here said they had enough on hand, but in smaller towns, dealers said the supplies that arrived were hard to keep.

The fuel committee for the public schools reported a purchase of 100 cords of wood. That was arranged when there was a prospect of a strike by railroad switchmen. It was deemed wise at that time to have a supply on hand rather than having to close schools.

** The public library here was the scene of the first "book day" held in North Dakota. Large numbers of latest books were put on display, so visitors could become familiar with the volumes on the shelves.

One of the tables was used by the Ontario Store to show its books. Two tables of books to delight children had a Mother Goose figure on top. Among the variety of books was one on typhoid fever, telling how it could be contracted and how the spread could be checked.

** Jack's Auditorium on North Fourth Street was the scene of a "brilliant social event" for the Tennis Association. Red, white and blue bunting was used lavishly in the ball room. The floor was "waxed to a nicety," the Herald reported.

Full dress was in order, and the Herald speculated that never in years had so many handsome gowns been seen at a social function in Grand Forks. Credit was given to the untiring efforts of Dr. W.H. Bates.

"In all probability," the Herald said, "it will become an annual event."

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Although it was cold in January 1910, the citizens of Grand Forks seemed to be out and about. The Metropolitan put on a "high class" vaudeville at a modest price Jan. 31.

The pages of the Herald 100 years ago reflect a progressive city. Architects Ross and Edwards were working on preliminary plans for a new school to be erected on the lot bounded by Cottonwood Street between Ninth and Tenth avenues.

The Grand Forks Daily Herald, run by George B. Winship, had 10,416 daily subscribers. The newspaper delivered by carrier cost $4.80 a year or 40 cents a month.

O.B. Hanson was president of the Scandinavian American Bank here. The Bjarne Chorus, a Scandinavian singing society, had been around for 28 years. It was considered one of the best of its kind in the U.S. and would place in the annual "sangerfest" to be held in Sioux Falls, S.D., in 1910.

E.J. Lander was president of the Commercial Club here 100 years ago. A Herald story told of his visit to Buxton, N.D., where he encouraged a group of business men to organize a commercial club. He talked of the accomplishments that can by made by such clubs.

In East Grand Forks in January 1910, J.J. O'Leary was beginning his term as mayor.

The devil Alcohol was a problem back then, too. Grand Forks had a North Dakota Liquor Institute at 722 N. Third St., with A.L. Winger as manager. Large ads in the Herald asked, "Why not wake up -- you are playing a losing game." The institute was there to help alcoholics.

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Ads in the Herald were signs of the times. Louis Rosenthal ladies ready-to-wear store was holding a half-price January clearance. One hundred trimmed hats, while they lasted, were going for $2.98.

The Ontario department store had its first shipment of spring wash fabrics at 15 cents to 20 cents a yard. The Ontario also featured white undermuslins -- corset covers, night robes, drawers and gowns.

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