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Woman seeks Fargo family of missing fair worker

FARGO - Cheryl Reas and her family often say John Reynolds was the best person who ever walked up to their concession stand. "He would cook. He would wash tables. He would do anything that you asked him to," said Reas, 52, whose family business s...

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FARGO – Cheryl Reas and her family often say John Reynolds was the best person who ever walked up to their concession stand.

"He would cook. He would wash tables. He would do anything that you asked him to," said Reas, 52, whose family business sells turkey legs and pork chops on a stick at fairs.

Reynolds, who's about 60 and used to live in the Fargo area, started working for the concession business last summer at the Minnesota State Fair. He was always on time, which is why Reas immediately knew something was wrong on Tuesday, March 17.

That day, Reynolds was supposed to work for a friend of Reas' at the Miami-Dade County Fair, but he never showed up. His clothes were there. His phone went straight to voicemail.

A week later, he's still missing.

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"We were hoping and praying that he had just walked away, but with him leaving all of his belongings, it just really worries us," Reas said.

Now, Reas is contacting media outlets across the country in an attempt to find Reynolds' family, including a cousin in Fargo and an uncle in Minnesota.

"I just feel like he's a special human being and somebody needs to know," she said. "If you had a family member missing and you didn't know where they were and they hadn't called, you would want to know where they're at."

Reynolds, a slim man who stands at about 5 feet 10 inches tall, has had his share of hardships.

When he was 12, his parents were killed in a car crash, and he was a ward of the state of Maine until his Minnesota uncle came for him, Reas said. In 2007, he battled colorectal cancer.

He worked for Reas' company, Carousel Foods based in Corydon, Ind., at the Minnesota State Fair, South Carolina State Fair and two fairs in Florida.

"Everywhere he went, he found libraries and churches," Reas said. "He loved to read, and he always had his Bible with him."

Reynolds is like family for Reas, and he called her two days before he went missing to say things were going well in Miami. The day before he disappeared, he won $100 in the lottery.

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"Our fear is that he had the money on him and someone saw it and that he could've gotten maybe mugged or something worse," Reas said. "I just feel really convicted to find his family, because they need to know that he's missing."

If you have any information, call Cheryl Reas at (812) 596-6280 or the Miami-Dade Police Department at (305) 378-4300.

Related Topics: FARGO
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