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Winnipeg police plan autopsy on toddler

WINNIPEG - Investigators are hoping an autopsy will reveal exactly what killed a 2-year-old whose caregiver was charged after the tot fell down the stairs.

WINNIPEG - Investigators are hoping an autopsy will reveal exactly what killed a 2-year-old whose caregiver was charged after the tot fell down the stairs.

The toddler was rushed to a hospital in critical condition after the fall Friday and died two days later.

Winnipeg police believe he was the victim of prolonged physical abuse, said Const. Jacqueline Chaput.

"At this point, until the autopsy is completed, it's yet to be determined whether the death was as a result of the injuries sustained in the fall or long-term abuse."

Chaput declined to specify what raised the investigators' suspicions, saying only that there was evidence of physical abuse.

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"It's very upsetting the child was very seriously physically assaulted, and I think we should just leave it at that," she said.

Police have also expressed concerns about possible abuse of the boy's 3-year-old sister.

Shirley Guimond, 52, was initially charged with criminal negligence causing bodily harm and two counts of assault causing bodily harm, but police said today the Crown's office is considering whether to revise the charges.

The boy, whose name wasn't released, was related to the accused but was not her son, police said.

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