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WILD HOG HALF MARATHON: Former Roughrider track athlete wins 5K race

Matt Tingum had a goal in mind when more than 400 runners lined up for the start of the 5K race Friday night -- the event that launched the second annual Wild Hog Half Marathon weekend in Grand Forks.

5K winner in the Wild Hog Grand Forks 1/2 Marathon, Matt Tingum
5K winner in the Wild Hog Grand Forks 1/2 Marathon, Matt Tingum, focuses on the finish line Friday. photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

Matt Tingum had a goal in mind when more than 400 runners lined up for the start of the 5K race Friday night -- the event that launched the second annual Wild Hog Half Marathon weekend in Grand Forks.

He met that goal. And it came as hundreds of fans were on hand to watch.

Tingum -- a former Grand Forks Red River track and cross country athlete -- won the 5K in 16 minutes flat. The 18-year-old finished 48 seconds ahead of Craig Knutson, another Grand Forks runner.

"I haven't done any 5Ks in a while but I wanted a PR," Tingum said. "My goal was 16 minutes. I was running for time. This was the first 5K I've raced on a road."

Tingum, while not running competitively, said he will continue to train in hopes of running more 5K events.

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"I'm going to keep doing it, maybe race a 10K and eventually maybe a half marathon," he said.

The 10K and half marathon races will be held this morning as the two-day event is expected to attract more than 2,000 runners to Grand Forks.

The rain did hold off for the 5K runners and those who participated in the family fun run that preceded the race.

Olympian Carrie Tollefson, who competed in the 2004 Games in Athens, started the race and also delivered an inspirational speech after the 5K. Tollefson, who will run in next week's Twin Cities Marathon, said she will run in today's 10K.

Brian Richter of Watertown, S.D., finished third in 18 minutes 5 seconds, while Mike White of the Grand Forks Air Force Base (18:09) and Oleksandr Collins of Grand Forks (18:19) rounded out the top five.

Ashley Hoscheit of Mankato, Minn., was the first women's finisher. Her time was 20:06.

Tingum, a UND student, said he was impressed with the Wild Hog event, which is expected to grow by 20 percent over last year.

"It's pretty cool and this is good for Grand Forks," he said.

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Nelson reports on sports. Call him at (701) 780-1268; (800) 477-6572, ext. 1268; or send e-mail to wnelson@gfherald.com .

Wayne Nelson is the sports editor at the Herald.


He has been with the Grand Forks Herald since 1995, serving as the UND football and basketball beat writer as well as serving as the sports editor.



He is a UND graduate and has been writing sports since the late 1970s.



Follow him on Twitter @waynenelsongf. You can reach him at (701) 780-1268 or wnelson@gfherald.com.
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