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What's going around: hand, foot, and mouth disease and the flu

GRAND FORKS, ND (WDAZ)--In this week's "What's Going Around," physicians are reporting cases of hand, foot and mouth disease, and the flu. Stephanie Hinkle from Sanford Health East Grand Forks Walk in Clinic has been seeing patients with hand, fo...

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GRAND FORKS, ND (WDAZ)-In this week’s “What’s Going Around,” physicians are reporting cases of hand, foot and mouth disease, and the flu. 

Stephanie Hinkle from Sanford Health East Grand Forks Walk in Clinic has been seeing patients with hand, foot and mouth disease. 

This disease often affects children, but adults can get it as well.

The main symptoms of the disease include the following:

  • Sores on the hands and feet that look like small red spots, bumps, or blisters
  • Sores in the mouth
  • Low grade fever

 
Hand, foot, and mouth usually goes away on its own with seven days, but it’s important to wash hands with soap and water to prevent spreading the infection.

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Rachel Faleide, with Cavalier County Memorial Hospital and Clinics in Langdon is seeing an increase in the stomach flu.

The main symptoms of the stomach flow include the following:

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Possibly fever & chills

 
The stomach flu can last up to a week.

 

Faleide recommends drinking as much water as possible to stay hydrated, to avoid eating solid foods, saying that bland diets are best.

Physicians also want to remind you that it’s time to get flu shots, saying that the shot will not make you sick, and it does not cause the flu.

So far, there have already been 13 reported cases of flu in North Dakota, and three of those in Grand Forks County.

Related Topics: HEALTH
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