Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

WATCH NOW: Challenge Accepted: Pickled Herring Challenge spreads to area newspapers

The Pickled Herring Challenge has made its way to area newspapers, with media staff throughout the region holding their nose and taking a bite of the Scandinavian delicacy.

The Pickled Herring Challenge has made its way to area newspapers, with media staff throughout the region holding their nose and taking a bite of the Scandinavian delicacy.

The Grand Forks Herald was the first to issue the challenge Dec. 3, downing the hors d'oeuvre and daring a handful of media outlets to do the same -- or donate to Santa Claus Girls, a Herald charity that provides Christmas presents to needy children.

Among those to pick up the glove -- and a plateful of fish -- were staff members at the Morris Sun Tribune and Hancock Record, the Worthington Daily Globe , the Alexandria Echo Press , the Brainerd Dispatch and the Bemidji Pioneer , all newspapers in Minnesota.

The salt-cured fish is usually garnished when served, with additions such as chili flakes, onions, dill, bay leaves or sour cream spicing up the dish. It’s usually served with a sauce made with whipped cream, vinegar and sugar.

Last year’s challenge was lutefisk, previously described by the Herald as “gelatinous, lye-soaked cod.” Herald reporters generally agreed pickled herring, while out of the ordinary, didn’t provoke the same level of culinary caution.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Herald also instigated that challenge.

There are still media outlets that have been challenged and have yet to try pickled herring. Check back to see who’s next, and find videos of newspapers taking on the challenge at www.grandforksherald.com .

Related Topics: FOOD
What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.