Sponsored By
An organization or individual has paid for the creation of this work but did not approve or review it.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Warmer temps speed up melt cycle

Warmer-than-expected temperatures have gotten the spring melt cycle under way earlier than anticipated, meteorologists said. That means the Red River and its tributaries may crest earlier, perhaps in early to mid-April, the experts said. WDAY-TV6...

Warmer-than-expected temperatures have gotten the spring melt cycle under way earlier than anticipated, meteorologists said.

That means the Red River and its tributaries may crest earlier, perhaps in early to mid-April, the experts said.

WDAY-TV6 Chief Meteorologist John Wheeler said Monday that Fargo-Moorhead and the valley have had above-average temperatures lately.

"It's been above freezing, for all but five or six hours, going back to last Thursday," he said.

That has made the melt move faster than was expected, but it's still slow and steady, he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Small increases in Red River levels in the metro are because of urban snowmelt, as streets and sidewalks heat up faster than fields, Wheeler said.

That same effect is seen in the Wahpeton, N.D., and Breckenridge, Minn., area. On top of that, drawdown water from the region's reservoirs is making its way into the Red.

Wheeler said the 48- and 50-degree temperatures that would trigger a rapid melt are unlikely right now given the density of the snowpack on fields. That snow and ice requires a lot of energy to turn into water, he said.

Last year, we went from 17 degrees below zero March 12, to 40 degrees March 14, Wheeler said. The next two days it hit 47. And a week later it was in the 50s. Then, it rained from March 22-24, dumping 1 to 3 inches in the valley, "and there was your flood," Wheeler said.

Related Topics: 2010 FLOODS
What To Read Next
Nonprofit hospitals are required to provide free or discounted care, also known as charity care; yet eligibility and application requirements vary across hospitals. Could you qualify? We found out.
Crisis pregnancy centers received almost $3 million in taxpayer funds in 2022. Soon, sharing only medically accurate information could be a prerequisite for funding.
The Grand Forks Blue Zones Project, which hopes to make Grand Forks not just a healthier city but a closer community, is hosting an event on Saturday, Jan. 21, at the Empire Arts Center from 3-5 p.m.
A bill being considered by the North Dakota Legislature would require infertility treatment for public employees — a step that could lead to requiring private insurance for the costly treatments.