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Volunteers breeze to goal of 1 million sandbags in Fargo

FARGO - Volunteers at Sandbag Central here reached their goal of filling a million sandbags - one day earlier than planned. Fargo Enterprise Director Bruce Grubb said 1,004,200 sandbags were filled as of 7 p.m. Thursday. "The count got a little m...

Drew Cohen and the millionth sandbag
Drew Cohen, 7, Fargo, filled the millionth sandbag Thursday at Sandbag Central. Special to The Forum

FARGO - Volunteers at Sandbag Central here reached their goal of filling a million sandbags - one day earlier than planned.

Fargo Enterprise Director Bruce Grubb said 1,004,200 sandbags were filled as of 7 p.m. Thursday.

"The count got a little more accurate today because when we got close we started counting each and every pallet," Grubb said.

Officials hoped to fill a million sandbags in 10 days after opening April 3. The sandbags will be shared evenly between the city of Fargo and Cass County.

Grubb said in addition to student volunteers, businesses and community members who walked-up helped make the sandbag effort a success.

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"I'm really proud to say I'm a part of this region," he said.

Karena Carlson, communications manager for Fargo said Sandbag Central will still be open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday.

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